Home & Design July 24, 2008
Sculpture Garden
Where Flora Meets Form

sculpture garden

The Great Day
Size: 30” x 20” x 10”
Media: Cast Bronze
Artist: Brad Rude

It is a gallery without a roof or walls. It is nature with unnatural forms.

As nature is often cited as having inspired a particular work of art, few venues then facilitate the connection between the subject, the artist and the art appreciator more congruously than a sculpture garden.

In a traditional gallery, lighting, paint and the structure’s overall tone contribute to the experience one takes away from viewing art in that environment.

sculpture garden

Serpentine 
Size: 74” x 42” x 24”
Media: Columnar Basalt 
Artist: Will Robinson

 

 

Art viewed in a garden is subject to the whimsy of the elements. It can look different to you on a daily basis. How you felt about one sculpture in spring with the backdrop of happy birds reunited from a trip south, flowers blooming and your own lilt of the season can be entirely different in the fall, with winter’s chill in the breeze, and mellow leaves blowing by.

On the following pages, you are invited to take a visual stroll through local gallery owner Gail Severn’s sculpture garden to enjoy what a photographer saw over several days and months last year.

sculpture garden

Twisting Path 
Size: 39” x 14” x 23”
Media: Basalt 
Artist: Will Robinson

sculpture garden

Cherokee Stele 
Size: 96” x 12” 
Media: Oil Enamel and Patina on Bronze 
Artist: Delos Van Earl

 

 

Sculpture is the Art of Intelligence.
            – Picasso

sculpture garden

Coyote I 6/6, Coyote VII 6/6 
Size: 21” x 51” x 9”, 28” x 36” x 13” 
Media: Bronze  Artist: Gwynn Murrill

sculpture garden

Forward Now (Unique) 
Size: 19” x 23” x 13”
Media: Cast Bronze  
Artist: Brad Rude

 

 

I saw the angel in the marble… and carved until I set him free.
            – Michelangelo

sculpture garden

Cylindrical Reflections  
Size: 120” x 36” x 36”  
Media: Steel and Limestone 
Artist: Mark Stasz

sculpture garden

Point of Return 
Size: 120” x 60” x 36” 
Media: Steel and Sandstone 
Artist: Mark Stasz

 

This article appears in the Spring 2008 Issue of Sun Valley Magazine.